Sunday, July 14, 2013

David Lotton Glass Designs

David Lotton started blowing glass in the mid 1970's. He was taught the art of glass blowing by his father the master, Charles Lotton. By the time he graduated from high school in 1978 he was proficient in making paperweights. He worked other jobs but eventually decided he wanted to work at glass making. David has a national reputation for making jewelry, paperweights and ruby-veiled sculptures.

David Lotton has his own glass making factory and studio which is called David Lotton Glass Designs. He learned from his father, but wanting his independence wanted to venture out on his own. David struggled in the early 1980's to find his own identity, which by his work you can see he accomplished.


David Lotton is the owner of David Lotton Glass Designs in Lowell, Indiana. David constructed a furnace of his own design in 1978, and has since devoted his life to his craft. David is a unique artisan in that he has created and developed his own formulas for each color. In his studio in Lowell, Indiana, working against the combined challenges of heat, gravity and time, David’s exquisite creations take shape through manipulation of molten glass in the ancient traditional art of glass blowing. Many of the colors used are David's own creations.

Collectors throughout the nation treasure David’s creations. His works are on display at many fine galleries, including his father Charles’ Glass Gallery in Crete Illinois. His work is also displayed in museums including the Corning Museum, the Bergstrom-Mahler Museum, the Newark Museum, and the Houston Museum of Fine Art. Below are some pictures of his magnificent work.

You can see more of his work at

Hope you enjoyed this information.

Thursday, June 13, 2013

Tibitu Glass - Taylor Backes Glass Artists - Hand Blown Glass

Tibtu Glass was established in 2002 by William Dexter and Etta Boettger. Tibitu glass is a collaborative work of Taylor Backes Glass Artists. Tibitu Glass is located in Boyertown PA. Tibitu is a workshop studio focusing on the celebration of designers and craftsman with a united goal of creating unique, original design and excellence in craftsmanship.

Artist and designer William Dexter’s work is exhibited in museums throughout the world, including the Philadelphia Museum of Art, The American Craft Museum and the Corning Museum of Glass. His work is also exhibited at the National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto Japan and the Glasmuseum Wertheim Germany.

Will Dexter is known for his massive sculptural vessels magnified by dynamic swirling forms of color among precious dichroic glass. Dichroic glass is a very thin glass which was developed for high technology applications. Dichroic glass has the ability to transmit one color while reflecting another.

I have attached pictures of a few pieces of Tibitu Glass which I have in my possession. Enjoy their exquisite beauty.

Saturday, June 1, 2013


Under the watchful eyes of Harry Northwood and with funding from investors from Ohio and West Virginia Imperial Glass Company was formed. The first glass for the Imperial Glass Company was produced in January of 1904.

Imperial Glass as with many other companies experienced hard times during the depression. Imperial filed for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy in 1931. Through some tough years Imperial survived, creating such new patterns as Cape Code and Candlewick. Candlewick was introduced in 1937 and became an even greater success than Cape Cod.

The elegant Candlewick pattern was made by the Imperial Glass Company of Belaire Ohio from 1937 to 1984. Production of this elegant pattern continued for almost 40 years. It has been my experience that lovers of Candlewick take very good care of their glass. Even though most of the Candlewick glass is 40 or more years old it looks barely used in most cases with very little utensil wear.

I have attached some pictures for your viewing pleasure.


Friday, May 24, 2013

Vintage Glass, Pottery and China make wonderful Wedding Gifts. They can start young people on a great adventure and appreciation of glass.

Looking for that unusual and unique gift that will not be duplicated?  Consider giving a vintage vase, vintage bowl or Vintage Cake Plate or platter. What a wonderful way to introduce a new young couple to the favulous world of vintage glass.

Thanks for visiting my Blog.

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Lotton Art Glass & Studios is having an Open House which is open to the public this weekend, Friday May 3, 2013 from 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. and Saturday May 4, 2013 from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. This is a great opportunity to meet Charles Lotton and his group of glassblowers and to see a vase or bowl actually being made. Also a great chance to view his Glass shop which is attached to the glassblowing facility. Hundreds of pieces of beautiful blown glass for sale. This is a free event.

Lotton Art Glass and Studios
24760 S. Country Lake
Crete Illinois 60417

This is located off Exchange in Crete Illinois right across from Walt's. If you live in Illinois or Indiana this would be a wonderful adventure.

Hope to see you there.

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Lotton Art Glass

I became interested in and then obsessed with Lotton Art Glass after attending an open house at The Lotton Art Glass studio in Crete Illinois a few years ago. At that time I saw Charles Lotton make a bowl and another glass blower make a vase. I was hooked.

Charles Lotton was born on a little farm in Elizabethtown Illinois. He was in the Marines and when he came home needed to find a profession or career. He got married and eventually had four children to support. He settled in as a Cosmetologist and loved the creative field. He opened his own hair salon and was very successful in his chosen field.

As fate would have it he saw some carnival glass and he was hooked on beautiful glass. He loved the color and iridescence of this type glass.

He built his first glass blowing furnace in his yard in Sauk Village with the help of a few friends in 1973.

More to come . . . .

Monday, December 3, 2012

Double Jack in the Pulpit

For your viewing pleasure.

Sometimes we find a gorgeous piece of glass and cannot identigy the maker but it is so unique it really doesn't matter. Enjoy!!!!!!!!